Sunday, February 19, 2012

A slight return to 2004. Wasn't that fun.

Tom Watson runs for the gap, specifically yet another ugly little employment law story at the Sun. Readers will know that they're like that among themselves and there's something of a press tradition of not mentioning the names. On this occasion it's Our Boys Go In Editor "Tom" "Newton" "Dunn" vs. their Whitehall editor Clodagh Hartley.

The other story is that Watson is suggesting that Trevor Kavanagh took the credit for publishing the Hutton whitewash ahead of time when Hartley was in fact responsible.

Sadly this just recalls Labour's relationship with the Sun. A close reading of this explains all:

Kavanagh, who claimed he had been read the contents of the report over the telephone by an “impartial” source went on to tell the BBC “the source had nothing to gain financially or politically, no axe to grind, no vested interest"

Access to the document, no financial or political interest, someone who had Kavanagh (or Hartley)'s direct phone number = i.e. they were a civil servant operating with permission from their boss who was in contact with them, or to put it another way, a government press officer.

As is fairly well known, Alistair Campbell got powers to give the career COI officials orders in May 1997. His departure didn't end that. The source was probably Godric Smith or Tom "Walter Mitty figure" Kelly. Kavanagh was lionised by the media establishment for having what was, in fact, the government's line-to-take read out into his ear by a government press officer. It wasn't as if the Blair governments were averse to racking up brownie points with Murdoch where possible, was it?

On the other hand, perhaps the most repellent of the Murdoch/Met cases was the Forest Gate raid of 2006, when the police launched a miniature Operation OVERLORD (or rather, MOTORMAN - I don't think they used a boat) in Walthamstow in pursuit of a "chemical dirty bomb suicide vest" which was capable of attacking aircraft up to 5,000 feet overhead in their opinion, accidentally shot someone because their hand slipped, tore the building apart, found nothing, and satisfied themselves by having the News of the World smear the suspects as paedophiles, before spending ages trying to seize their savings. It wasn't so much a police operation as a sort of wildly overdone high-camp mashup of 2000s tropes. News International columnist Andy Hayman was in charge, but perhaps we were spared worse:

The police always argue that (many things they do) are a matter of operations and politicians should not be involved. Well, I'm afraid I have a big argument with that."

Citing the 2006 raid on a street in Forest Gate, he added: "At one stage the police were going to turn out all the residents of the street at 2am in the morning. John Reid was the home secretary and I was working with him.

"Andy Hayman, who was in charge, wanted to turn them out and I said to John Reid - no, you can't do that. He said 'John, it's operational'. I said 'S** operational, there are political considerations here' - turning out a street of Asians at 2am with the allegations of a gas plot and we don't know what the evidence is for that."

So when did they start tapping Prescott's phone?

It remains the case that Labour's half of the twisted relationship with Murdoch was very different to the Tories'. It was transactional and contingent and that's one of the reasons why it was so horrible at the time, but that also made it possible to leave. When you are one entity you cannot cooperate, said Montgomery. It's also very hard to stop.

Production note: part of this post was originally a comment on Tom Watson's blog and was never released from moderation. I might have been nice about this, but you know.

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