Sunday, March 21, 2010

Sunday SDR, Chapter 5: People, Equipment, and Structures

So we've had the grand tour d'horizon; we've had the self criticism; we've had the very rapid skip over the nuclear issue; we've had a careful balance of general-purpose capability and counterinsurgent language. Now for some hardcore bureaucracy. It's Chapter 5 of the SDR Green Paper - People, Equipment, and Structures.

This kicks off with the MOD's personnel problems. As in essentially any organisation of the last 15 years or so, there's an invocation of having to learn new skills many times in your career, etc, etc. There's going to be a "whole force concept" review of how the MOD manages its people. There are warm words about looking after our veterans being a moral value. And then there's this:

The provision of accommodation, for example, is a potential disincentive to home ownership and may not represent the best investment we can make in helping families and personnel deal with the demands of Service life.

I would have thought the disincentive to home ownership would be the wages, and the, well, demands of Service life. (How many mortgage lenders are cool with the idea that the signatory may get shot at any moment?) Seriously. What the fuck? Apparently they're looking at "alternative models for accommodation", which might be good if it involved killing off the Annington Homes money pit, but it doesn't sound like it.

On equipment, the general theme of a renewed interest in industrial policy is there, although the section is very general indeed, in fact vague. Tellingly, the issue of operational sovereignty - which has flared up all over again with regard to the F-35 - is raised:
We will have to revalidate our overall approach to:
* Operational Sovereignty. Our Armed Forces rely on assured overseas sources for some important equipment and support but there are cases where specific industrial capability must be located in the UK for operational reasons

There's also a nod to arms exporters, presumably to pass the document through the bits of the MOD involved with DESO and friends.

On organisational issues, the chapter contains a bit more meat; it appears a major re-apprisal of the MOD's structure and business processes is coming, although the drafters warn that the costs of constant reorganisation have been a very serious problem.
Change must be considered carefully in the light of the risks associated with reorganisation highlighted in the Haddon- Cave Report. The future Review will offer an opportunity to re-examine the model and to determine whether and how we might be able to improve on it.

Haddon-Cave is the report on the Nimrod XV230 crash in 2006, which demonstrated that the Nimrod fleet was essentially unairworthy in its entirety and that the engineering and management systems intended to guarantee the safety and effectiveness of the MOD's aircraft. A major issue it identified was the impact of constant organisational change - something of a theme throughout the public sector in the Blair era.

The chapter finishes with a ritual call for greater efficiency. There's also this worrying statement, in the light of the bizarre property-booster bit:
the scope for further rationalisation of the defence estate;

Not again...

In short, if Chapter 3 was impressive, Chapter 5 is poor - with the exception of the reference to Haddon-Cave, it's mostly either made up of truisms or else simply too vague to mean anything at all. And what on earth is this stuff about property? Notably, the comments home in on it at once; it's also noticeable that by Chapter 5, the trolls have landed.

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